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Ebenezer Methodist Church Cemetery
Nassau
New Providence District  Bahamas

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Cemetery notes and/or description:
The Ebenezer Methodist Church and its cemetery are located at Shirley Street in Nassau.
P.O. Box SS-6145
Nassau
BAHAMAS

Ebenezer Methodist Church began with open-air meetings, which were conducted by the Rev. William Turton (1761-1818) shortly after his arrival at Nassau in October, 1800. The wooden East Chapel was partially destroyed by a hurricane in 1813, but was re-built. As converts to Methodism were growing the re-built East Chapel was not able to accommodate all who wished to attend the services and consequently the foundation stone for the present Ebenezer Methodist Church was laid on the 29th March, 1839. Ebenezer, along with 34 other Churches in The Bahamas, signed the Deed of Union to form The Bahamas Conference of The Methodist Church in April, 1992.
For more information go to the web site:
Ebenezer Methodist Church in Nassau

A smaller old part of the cemetery lies in front of the church building with just a few old grave sites remaining. The main part of the cemetery is behind the church building. Due to the climate of this region, the graves are mostly concrete vaults covered with just a stone or concrete slab. No lawns, and no plants are decorating the grave sites.
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Ebenezer Methodist Church Cemetery
Added by: RosalieAnn
 
Ebenezer Methodist Church Cemetery
Added by: Frank K.
 
Ebenezer Methodist Church Cemetery
Added by: Frank K.
 
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