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Kenny Delmar
Birth: Sep. 5, 1910
Boston
Suffolk County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Jul. 14, 1984
Stamford
Fairfield County
Connecticut, USA

Radio and Television Cartoon Actor. He is best remembered for creating the windbag character 'Senator Beauregard Claghorn' on the Fred Allen's radio program "Allen's Alley" and it became a primary inspiration for the Warner Brothers cartoon character 'Foghorn Leghorn'. Born Kenneth Frederick Fay Howard on September 5, 1910 in Boston, Massachusetts, he moved to New York City, New York as an infant after his parents separated. His mother, Evelyn Delmar, was a vaudevillian who toured the country with her sister and he appeared on stage from age of seven. His first screen appearance was in the D. W. Griffith film "Orphans of the Storm" (1921), in which he played the 'Joseph Schildkraut' role as a child. He changed his name to Kenny Delmar and during the early 1930s, he left the stage to work in his stepfather's business. After running his own dancing school for a year, he decided to try a career in radio. By the late 1930s he was an announcer on such major radio series as "The March of Time," "The Danny Kaye Show," "Jungle Jim," "The Shadow," and "Your Hit Parade." He played multiple roles in The Mercury Theatre on the Air's infamous October 1938 radio drama "The War of the Worlds," with his main role was that of the character 'Captain Lansing', the National Guardsman who collapses in terror when confronted by the Martian invaders. While serving as the announcer for the radio program "Allen's Alley," the character 'Senator Beauregard Claghorn made its debut on October 7, 1945 and after six months it was called "unquestionably the most quoted man in the nation" by Life magazine. The role inspired the Warner Brothers animated character 'Foghorn Leghorn', first seen in the Oscar-nominated cartoon "Walky Talky Hawky" (1946). In the late 1940s, he captivated 20 million radio listeners every Sunday night with his burlesque of a bombastic, super-chauvinistic legislator who drank only from Dixie cups and refused to drive through the Lincoln Tunnel. His stock expression, "That's a joke, son," was for many years one of the nation's pet phrases, mimicked by children and businessmen alike. The character was inspired by a Texas cattle rancher who had picked him up while he was hitchhiking and barely stopped talking. He had a starring role in the Broadway musical "Texas, L'il Darlin'" that ran from November 1949 until September 1950 and also starred as 'Claghorn' in a theatrical feature film, "It's a Joke, Son!" (1947). During this time he also announced and did voice performances on radio's "The Alan Young Show." One of the characters that he played was 'Counselor Cartonbranch' who is obviously similar in mannerisms and voice to 'Senator Claghorn'. He also lent his voice to Saturday morning cartoons in the 1960s, including 'Commander McBragg' on "Tennessee Tuxedo and His Tales," 'The Hunter' on "King Leonardo and His Short Subjects," "The Beagles," "Underdog," and other Saturday morning cartoon icons. He died in Stamford, Connecticut at the age of 73. (bio by: William Bjornstad) 
 
Burial:
Long Ridge Union Cemetery
Stamford
Fairfield County
Connecticut, USA
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Record added: Jan 14, 2000
Find A Grave Memorial# 8129
Kenny Delmar
Added by: quebecoise
 
Kenny Delmar
Added by: Elliot
 
Kenny Delmar
Added by: Elliot
 
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- Cindy
 Added: Sep. 5, 2014
On your 104th birthday
- Nancy Forrest
 Added: Sep. 3, 2014

- Blackwasp
 Added: Jul. 14, 2014
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