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 • San Remo Cemetery
 • San Remo
 • Provincia di Imperia
 • Liguria
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Edward Lear
Birth: May 12, 1812
Holloway
Greater London, England
Death: Jan. 29, 1888
San Remo
Provincia di Imperia
Liguria, Italy

English Artist, Illustrator, Author and Poet. He is known now mostly for his literary nonsense in poetry and prose and especially his limericks, a form he popularised. His principal areas of work as an artist were threefold: as a draughtsman employed to illustrate birds and animals; making coloured drawings during his journeys, which he reworked later, sometimes as plates for his travel books; as a (minor) illustrator of Alfred Tennyson's poems. As an author, he is known principally for his popular nonsense works, which use real and invented English words. He was educated at home, mainly by his sister Ann, who was twenty one years his senior. He suffered from an early age from asthma and bronchitis, and also both depression (the 'Morbids') and epilepsy (the 'demon'). In 1827 the family split up, and he set up house in Grays Inn Road, London, with his sister Ann. He began to draw to earn a living around 1827, colouring screens, fans and prints, and for some time making disease drawings for doctors and hospitals. In 1830 he made application to the Zoological Society to make drawings of the parrots in their collection. From his drawings from life he produced fine hand coloured lithographs, which he sold by subscription. Though the series was never finished. In 1831 he began collaborating with John Gould on the Birds of Europe, and accompanied him to Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Berlin and Berne. Lord Stanley, Earl of Derby, had seen him at work at the zoological gardens, and invited him to his 100 acre Knowsley Park, near Liverpool, to make drawings of the birds in his menagerie. Lear worked at Knowsley off and on for the next six years. He also developed ambitions to become a landscape painter, and enrolled in Sass's School of Art, which prepared students for the Royal Academy Schools, then visited Ireland and toured the Lake District, making sketches. his health deteriorated, and Lord Stanley and his nephew Robert Hornby together offered to send him to Rome. He stayed in Italy for most of the next 10 years, supporting himself by teaching and selling drawings. nonsense works are distinguished by a facility of verbal invention and a poet's delight in the sounds of words, both real and imaginary. A stuffed rhinoceros becomes a "diaphanous doorscraper". A "blue Boss-Woss" plunges into "a perpendicular, spicular, orbicular, quadrangular, circular depth of soft mud". His heroes are Quangle-Wangles, Pobbles, and Jumblies. His most famous piece of verbal invention, the phrase "runcible spoon", occurs in the closing lines of The Owl and the Pussycat, and is now found in many English dictionaries. (bio by: julia&keld) 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Jeremiah Lear (1757 - 1833)
  Ann Clarke Skerrett Lear (1769 - 1844)
 
 Siblings:
  Ann Lear (1791 - 1861)*
  Sarah Lear Street (1794 - 1873)*
  Mary Lear Boswell (1796 - 1861)*
  Henry Lear (1798 - 1877)*
  Cordelia Lear (1803 - 1834)*
  Frederick Lear (1805 - 1888)*
  Florence Lear (1806 - 1838)*
  Charles Lear (1808 - ____)*
  Edward Lear (1812 - 1888)
  Catherine Lear (1813 - 1837)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
San Remo Cemetery
San Remo
Provincia di Imperia
Liguria, Italy
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: julia&keld
Record added: May 12, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 90003214
Edward Lear
Added by: julia&keld
 
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- Mellissa Lake Co. Illinois
 Added: Jan. 29, 2014
There once was a man name of Lear. A good chap with plenty of cheer. He loved birds and was filled with alegria. And he rests now in Liguria...Rest in Peace, Edward. See you in Heaven.
- Mary
 Added: Oct. 11, 2013
The creator of "the Pobble without any toes", of dozens of wonderful limericks, and "The Owl and The Pussycat" which has one of the most beautiful conclusions of any Victorian poem: "They dined on mince, and slices of quince, which they ate with a runcibl...(Read more)
- J.B.
 Added: Jun. 27, 2013
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