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Tom C (#46546890)
 member for 13 years, 11 months, 29 days
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Pleaae use the edit button if you want something changed When you want a transfer please state how your are related to the person if you do not state how and be honest I will not respond. I am willing to link add places of birth and death and other information.. you may use any of the tombstone photos that I have posted
Please do not add death records to my memoral's they do not belong on my menorials
Please yes the edit tab if you want something Addd
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BrixtonWy, LaDon Brennan
Messages left for Tom C (488)[Leave Message]
Diana
RE: Gaines
Oh wow! No, I am not related either. I was connecting a sister of theirs and noticed the dates.
Added by Diana on Jul 27, 2016 12:59 PM
Gina L.
RE: Dennis Ellison
He married Lauren Sue Sweringer
Added by Gina L. on Jul 26, 2016 11:07 AM
Gina L.
RE: Dennis Ellison
HIS MIDDLE NAME IS RAY
Added by Gina L. on Jul 26, 2016 11:05 AM
Gina L.
RE: Dennis Ellison
HE WAS BORN AND DIED IN MISSOURI
Added by Gina L. on Jul 26, 2016 11:04 AM
Bonnie Dilworth
RE: Ida B Tuttle High
Thanks so much for the additional info. My cousin is a Tuttle and will be grateful to get this.
Added by Bonnie Dilworth on Jul 21, 2016 5:02 PM
Bonnie Dilworth
Ida B Tuttle High
Thanks for the info. Are you by chance related to Ida?
Added by Bonnie Dilworth on Jul 21, 2016 4:36 PM
Celedon
Memorial #67751966 James R Estill
Could you please add the following to this memorial:
JAMES R ESTILL
Mr. ESTILL, on the fathers side, is of Scottish origin, the founder of
the family in this country, having come over from Scotland prior to the
revolution. His grandfather, Captain James ESTILL, was one of the early
settlers of Kentucky, to which he emigrated as early as 1780. The following
extract concerning his life in that state is taken from Collins Kentucky:
Captain James ESTILL, in honor of whom ESTILL county was named, was a native
of Augusta county, Virginia. He came to Kentucky at an early period and
settled on Muddy creek, in the present county of Madison, where he built a
station which received the name of ESTILLs station. In 1781, in a skirmish
with the Indians, he received a rifle shot in one of his arms by which it was
broken. In March, 1782, with a small body of men, about twenty-five, it is
believed, he pursued a similar number of Wyandotts across the Kentucky river
and into Montgomery county; there he fought one of the severest and most bloody
battles on record when the number of men on both sides are taken into account.
Captain ESTILL and his brave Lieutenant SOUTH, were both killed in the retreat
which succeeded. Thus fell, says Captain MOREHEAD in his Boonsboro address,
Captain James ESTILL, one of Kentuckys bravest and most beloved defenders.
He was only thirty-two years of age when he fell in defence of the state by the
bullet of the savage. He was married in Virginia, to a Miss CAMPBELL, by whom
he had five children. Wallace ESTILL, James R.s father, was in his infancy at
the time of his fathers death. He was reared to habits of industry by his
mother, and when he reached manhood had acquired a good education and was a
practical surveyor. He was twice married. His first wife, Miss Mary HARDIN,
daughter of Colonel HARDIN, survived their marriage only about three months.
About five years afterwards he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth,
daughter of Robert RODES, a prominent business man and a large farmer of
Madison county. From this union five sons and a daughter were reared. Between
1815 and 1819, he visited Missouri several times, buying lands in Howard and
Boone counties. On one of this visits he, with some others, laid off the town
of Columbia, the present county seat of Boone county. Though he often
expressed a purpose so to do, he never settled in Missouri, but continued to
reside in his native state until his death, which occurred in Madison county.
His wife preceded him to the grave about five years. Early in life they both
connected themselves with the Baptist church, but after the Christian
denomination was established they united with that church, with which they ever
afterwards held the closest and most exemplary relationship. James R. ESTILL,
the subject of this memoir, was born in Madison county, Kentucky, January 30th,
1819. He was reared to manhood in his native county and there afterwards
served as sheriff two years. In 1843, he came to Howard county, and here, two
years subsequently, purchased 460 acres of land on which he still resides.
This purchase embraced the farms improved by DRAKE, BROWN and COOLEY. Some of
it has been in cultivation since 1816, sixty-seven years, and is said to be as
productive now as when first broken. His farm, however, at this time, contains
1,450 acres, all finely improved and in excellent condition. What is not in
cultivation is in grass, either blue grass, clover or timothy. He has several
large orchards—one of fifteen acres, devoted to a single variety of fruit
exclusively, the Ben Davis apple. He also feeds for the markets several
hundred head of cattle every season. Mr. ESTILL now owns in this county about
2,800 acres of land. He also owns large amounts of real estate in Chariton and
Saline counties, and valuable property in the city of St. Louis, besides his
landed interests in Kentucky. As a citizen he is as useful to the county and
as public-spirited as he has been successful in his private affairs. But he
has never sought office nor aspired to any position of prominence except as a
leader in the development of the resources of the county, and in this he has
taken conspicuous and active parts. He was prominently identified with the
movement that resulted in the construction of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas
railway through this county, and contributed as much and perhaps more than any
other citizen of the county to that result. In recognition of zeal for this
enterprise and of his special fitness for the position, he was appointed agent
for the county by the county court, to manage its stock subscribed to the road.
And in further recognition of his services in this enterprise, ESTILL station,
on the road in this county, was established and named in his honor. His chief
ambition has been to make himself a useful citizen, and to contribute his share
toward the material development and social elevation of the community in which
his life and fortune have been cast. He is a steadfast friend of education and
of every movement that tends to enlighten or ameliorate the condition of the
people. As a farmer and stock raiser he belongs to the advanced progressive
school that believes in farming on intelligent principles and raising none but
the best class of stock. Such has been his business and social life—his life
as a citizen. Mr. ESTILL was united in marriage to Miss Mary TURNER, daughter
of Talton and Sallie TURNER, March 20th, 1845. Eight children were born as the
fruit of this union, four of whom are still living: Wallace, married and
settled in Franklin township; Ellen, William R. and Mary C. Alice died about
six months after her marriage to Mr. Lewis C. NELSON, son of James NELSON, of
Boonville, and at the time a banker in Fort Scott, Kansas. The others died in
infancy. Talton TURNER, the father of Mrs. ESTILL, was a native of Kentucky,
but came to Missouri in an early day, and for many years was one of the leading
citizens and traders of central Missouri. He was a practical surveyor also,
and surveyed several counties of this part of the state for the government. He
was a man of more than ordinary ability, enterprising and energetic, and was a
leader among the men of his time.

This will need to be properly formatted. The information comes from Howard County Biographies- Franklin Township USGenWeb

Thanks!
Added by Celedon on Jul 21, 2016 7:10 AM
Celedon
Memorial #67751966 James R Estill
Could you please add the following to this memorial:
JAMES R ESTILL
Mr. ESTILL, on the father's side, is of Scottish origin, the founder of
the family in this country, having come over from Scotland prior to the
revolution. His grandfather, Captain James ESTILL, was one of the early
settlers of Kentucky, to which he emigrated as early as 1780. The following
extract concerning his life in that state is taken from Collin's Kentucky:
"Captain James ESTILL, in honor of whom ESTILL county was named, was a native
of Augusta county, Virginia. He came to Kentucky at an early period and
settled on Muddy creek, in the present county of Madison, where he built a
station which received the name of ESTILL's station. In 1781, in a skirmish
with the Indians, he received a rifle shot in one of his arms by which it was
broken. In March, 1782, with a small body of men, about twenty-five, it is
believed, he pursued a similar number of Wyandotts across the Kentucky river
and into Montgomery county; there he fought one of the severest and most bloody
battles on record when the number of men on both sides are taken into account.
Captain ESTILL and his brave Lieutenant SOUTH, were both killed in the retreat
which succeeded. 'Thus fell,' says Captain MOREHEAD in his Boonsboro address,
'Captain James ESTILL, one of Kentucky's bravest and most beloved defenders.'"
He was only thirty-two years of age when he fell in defence of the state by the
bullet of the savage. He was married in Virginia, to a Miss CAMPBELL, by whom
he had five children. Wallace ESTILL, James R.'s father, was in his infancy at
the time of his father's death. He was reared to habits of industry by his
mother, and when he reached manhood had acquired a good education and was a
practical surveyor. He was twice married. His first wife, Miss Mary HARDIN,
daughter of Colonel HARDIN, survived their marriage only about three months.
About five years afterwards he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth,
daughter of Robert RODES, a prominent business man and a large farmer of
Madison county. From this union five sons and a daughter were reared. Between
1815 and 1819, he visited Missouri several times, buying lands in Howard and
Boone counties. On one of this visits he, with some others, laid off the town
of Columbia, the present county seat of Boone county. Though he often
expressed a purpose so to do, he never settled in Missouri, but continued to
reside in his native state until his death, which occurred in Madison county.
His wife preceded him to the grave about five years. Early in life they both
connected themselves with the Baptist church, but after the Christian
denomination was established they united with that church, with which they ever
afterwards held the closest and most exemplary relationship. James R. ESTILL,
the subject of this memoir, was born in Madison county, Kentucky, January 30th,
1819. He was reared to manhood in his native county and there afterwards
served as sheriff two years. In 1843, he came to Howard county, and here, two
years subsequently, purchased 460 acres of land on which he still resides.
This purchase embraced the farms improved by DRAKE, BROWN and COOLEY. Some of
it has been in cultivation since 1816, sixty-seven years, and is said to be as
productive now as when first broken. His farm, however, at this time, contains
1,450 acres, all finely improved and in excellent condition. What is not in
cultivation is in grass, either blue grass, clover or timothy. He has several
large orchards—one of fifteen acres, devoted to a single variety of fruit
exclusively, the "Ben Davis" apple. He also feeds for the markets several
hundred head of cattle every season. Mr. ESTILL now owns in this county about
2,800 acres of land. He also owns large amounts of real estate in Chariton and
Saline counties, and valuable property in the city of St. Louis, besides his
landed interests in Kentucky. As a citizen he is as useful to the county and
as public-spirited as he has been successful in his private affairs. But he
has never sought office nor aspired to any position of prominence except as a
leader in the development of the resources of the county, and in this he has
taken conspicuous and active parts. He was prominently identified with the
movement that resulted in the construction of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas
railway through this county, and contributed as much and perhaps more than any
other citizen of the county to that result. In recognition of zeal for this
enterprise and of his special fitness for the position, he was appointed agent
for the county by the county court, to manage its stock subscribed to the road.
And in further recognition of his services in this enterprise, ESTILL station,
on the road in this county, was established and named in his honor. His chief
ambition has been to make himself a useful citizen, and to contribute his share
toward the material development and social elevation of the community in which
his life and fortune have been cast. He is a steadfast friend of education and
of every movement that tends to enlighten or ameliorate the condition of the
people. As a farmer and stock raiser he belongs to the advanced progressive
school that believes in farming on intelligent principles and raising none but
the best class of stock. Such has been his business and social life—his life
as a citizen. Mr. ESTILL was united in marriage to Miss Mary TURNER, daughter
of Talton and Sallie TURNER, March 20th, 1845. Eight children were born as the
fruit of this union, four of whom are still living: Wallace, married and
settled in Franklin township; Ellen, William R. and Mary C. Alice died about
six months after her marriage to Mr. Lewis C. NELSON, son of James NELSON, of
Boonville, and at the time a banker in Fort Scott, Kansas. The others died in
infancy. Talton TURNER, the father of Mrs. ESTILL, was a native of Kentucky,
but came to Missouri in an early day, and for many years was one of the leading
citizens and traders of central Missouri. He was a practical surveyor also,
and surveyed several counties of this part of the state for the government. He
was a man of more than ordinary ability, enterprising and energetic, and was a
leader among the men of his time.

This will need to be properly formatted. The information comes from "Howard County Biographies- Franklin Township" USGenWeb

Thanks!
Added by Celedon on Jul 21, 2016 7:09 AM
Jay Raveill
Mrs. K Turner
Thanks for the note. Glad to be of help.

Jay
Added by Jay Raveill on Jul 19, 2016 4:53 PM
J. Walter "Jim Drew" Whitaker
Anna Bingham Clark
Hi Tom, You hace Anne Bingham Clark Brown, Memorial # 42638530, with wrong parents. She was the d/o Benjamin & Jane Mullins Clark according to her marriage record to James Brown; 25 Jun 1810. Thanks.
Added by J. Walter "Jim Drew" Whit... on Jul 14, 2016 1:17 PM
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