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Betty Paulsen (#47136232)
 member for 7 years, 6 months, 9 days
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Bio and Links
Bio Photo I am here to help others in having information to the best I can on their loved ones that have passed away. My parents used to take me to cemeteries to clean them up. I found the headstones remarkable. Then my parents taught me how to do research on my families.
If there are names or dates that are not right then please correct them. Most of what I have put on here is from the Sanders County Ledger, Sanders County, Montana. I know like death certificates that they can be wrong in their information also. My parents had the paper come to them to learn of their friends that passed away and I collected them. But since obits are not permitted on here I try and put the dates and places that are on the obits on the people. So change what needs to be changed and you are all doing a wonderful job in putting records on here for people. I am thankful to you all for your great effort.
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Messages left for Betty Paulsen (142)[Leave Message]
Janet
RE: Lavina Caroline Johnston Benedict
I think most of my pics of her are in her older years as they didn't have access to a camera sooner.
Email me the pic and I can compare, if you don't mind sharing.
Added by Janet on Nov 03, 2016 11:45 PM
Alana Knochel Bauman
RE: Frank L Hoover
Thank you. It looks like the same one. I have an obituary, which may help you.
Added by Alana Knochel Bauman on Oct 14, 2016 12:55 PM
Alana Knochel Bauman
RE: Frank L Hoover
Could you give me the Find A Grave number on mine and the number on the duplicate? Thanks for noticing.
Added by Alana Knochel Bauman on Oct 14, 2016 11:20 AM
Alana Knochel Bauman
RE: Frank L Hoover
I afraid I do not understand your question. The Find A Grave number was to Frank L. Hoover, but he is not mine.
Added by Alana Knochel Bauman on Oct 14, 2016 7:54 AM
diana butcher
Brackett connection to Austin
Hi Betty,
These are new working notes that I put in my genealogy database today under Daniel Brackett. I already have some under Jeremiah.
Let me know what you think, keeping in mind
that the Austins and Bracketts came from
ME (which was MA back then) to NY and on to MI:

This is what I worked out on 24 Jun 2016 after studying what Jeremiah B. Austins descendants state - that Jeremiahs father/grandfather came from Scotland and that the father or grandfather worked at a dry dock on the River Clyde (which is near Glasgow).

http://www.curiousfox.com/vill100/Lanarkshire27850_5.html
Posted Oct 2004
Glasgow, Lanarkshire
Glasgow
Looking for information on Jeremiah B. Austin who was born in Scotland about 1801. According to family stories he was born in Scotland and his father was a shipbuilder on the River Clyde. Jeremiah B. Austin either came as a child or a young man to Niagara to Orleans County, New York and got married to a Olive Green. I am in search for his parents. I have a lot on him in the United States that I am willing to share.

Dianas notes:
1. I figure that it was Jeremiahs B. (Brackett, probably) Austins Grandfather Brackett (and possibly could have been the Austin grandfather, as well) who came from the Country of Scotland, unless it was Scotland, Berwick, ME from whence he came.


2. Daniel Brackett came from Scotland to Berwick. And, Scotland was part of the town of Berwick,
ME. So, Daniel could have been born in the Country of Scotland or the section of Berwick,
known as Scotland. Im banking on Scotland, Berwick, ME. If so, some of the Daniel and Mary/Polly (Brackett) Austin descendants, including what I worked up, may be incorrect. I used the Daniel Austin - Hannah Charles line in the 1970s and 1980s, then switched to what the Austin Families of America has with William Austin and Laughing Water as the earliest Austin, and now wondering about Berwick, ME.

3. http://intlmerch.tripod.com/id5.html

Origin of the name Brackett

White Winter Premium Oak Brackett. This stuff elevates beer drinking to a new level. Brackett is a style of mead, which is an alcoholic drink made from honey, water and yeast. Mead-making pre-dates beer and wine making, having origins dating back 8,000 years. Brackett originates from ancient Scandinavia and is made by adding malt to mead. Its a stout, full-bodied drink with a slightly thicker viscosity and higher alcohol content than other fermented grain beverages. Legend has it that sweet mead promotes fertility. Ladies, this meads for you!

It is now quite certain that my ancestor is Anthony Brackett an early 1630s Maine settler possibly born in 1613 in Norfolk, England or Scotland. He died 1696 in Sandy Beach (Rye), NH . Reccords from my cousin Warren in Jan 06 confirm this . I am still looking for the exact link in the 1770 to 1800 generation. my confirmed ancestor Jacob Brackett was born 8 nov 1800 Berwick,York, Maine There are several possibilities as to which Brackett was his father.
Any help would be helpfull.

See also this page
http://home.earthlink.net/~anderson207/BrackIndex.html and related pages!

4. http://www.oldberwick.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=261&Itemid=255
Old Berwick Historical Society

The Scottish Prisoners of 1650
Why “Berwick”?
17th century tower in Dunbar, Scotland

Until 1814, Maine’s three Berwicks -- South Berwick, Berwick and North Berwick -- were all one town, Berwick.

Why that name?

Many New England towns were named for English towns -- Plymouth, Massachusetts or Dover, New Hampshire, for example. Some -- like Pittsfield, MA, or Wolfeboro, NH -- were named to honor great English leaders. Throughout the 1600s the area that became the Berwicks in Maine was part of the town of Kittery and known at first as Quamphegan or Newichawannock. But gradually the name Barwick or Berwick took hold, taken from a town associated with England’s old rival, Scotland. Why?

17th century tower in Dunbar, Scotland

Except during brief intervals, Scotland was still a separate kingdom until the Act of Union in 1707. The Scottish throne and boundaries had long been disputed with London. The town of Berwick-on-Tweed (pronounced Barrick) is only about 40 miles (64.5 km) from the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, and sits right on the contested Scots-English border at the mouth of the Tweed River on the coast. In previous centuries, Berwick was also the name of the Tweed’s old wool-producing inland shire or county vital to international trade. Vikings had first settled there, and Berwick meant “Corn Bay” in the Norse language. In the Middle Ages, the town became Scotland’s busiest port. Today part of England but Scottish in culture and dialect, Berwick-on-Tweed has changed hands some 13 times during the past thousand years.

The former Scottish county of Berwick about a century ago is shown on the map below.* The town Berwick-on-Tweed at right, at the mouth of the Tweed River, faces the North Sea about 40 miles (64.5 km) southeast of Edinburgh, Scotland, but is on the English side of the border. Dunbar is about halfway between Berwick-on-Tweed and Edinburgh.
To enlarge the map, click on the small rectangle. The former Scottish county of Berwick about a century ago. The town Berwick-on-Tweed at right, at the mouth of the Tweed River, faces the North Sea about 40 miles (64.5 km) southeast of Edinburgh, Scotland, but is on the English side of the border. Dunbar is about halfway between Berwick-on-Tweed and Edinburgh.
=============================================================
The year 1650 marked one such struggle. At nearby Dunbar, situated midway between Edinburgh and the Scots-English border, Oliver Cromwell won a battle that allowed him to wrest the Scottish capital from Royalists and unify Scotland and England for several years. The battle of Dunbar (and another at Worcester in 1651) led to the forced emigration of captured Scottish soldiers to work in the American colonies. About 60 Scots were sent to Saugus Iron Works in Massachusetts, and about 25 were brought to set up the Great Works sawmill at a site that is now on Brattle Street in South Berwick, Maine.
=============================================================
When these young and impoverished prisoners eventually obtained their freedom they stayed, joining the English founding families of a tiny settlement. Among these displaced Scotsmen were said to be Niven Agnew, James Barry, Alexander Cooper, Daniel Ferguson, William Furbush, William Gowen, Peter Grant, George Gray, David Hamilton, Thomas Holme, John Key, Alexander Maxwell, John Neal, John Reed, John Ross, John Taylor, William Thomson, and James Warren (from Downeast Ancestry, Vol. 9, No. 3). Learn more about the trail of the 1650 Scottish prisoners.

As the years passed, the name Berwick began to appear. Settleing Barwicke Bridg, reads the Maine Provincial and Court Records III, p. 32. of June 28, 1682. It is ordered that the Select Men of Barwicke, do forthwith appoint 3 meete persons, to join with the committee impoured for erecting of a bridg over little Newgewwanacke [i.e. Great Works] River...” The choice of Barwick or Berwick as a name seems strange. The conscript soldiers captured at Dunbar had apparently come from all over Scotland, so Berwick wasn’t a common ancestral home. Their descendants would have made up only a fraction of the local population, and soon became assimilated, apparently professing English Congregationalism rather than the Presbyterianism of their homeland. To them the name Berwick, rather than symbolizing a treasured part of their past, more likely had negative associations with 1650 and with earlier battles in which the Scots went down to defeat. So why would the Scottish and English colonists of southern Maine have named their parish after the Scottish Berwick?

Historian Emerson W. Baker thinks the name Berwick could have been a domination tactic forced on the settlement by the Puritan church authorities in Boston.

“Massachusetts tended to name communities as [Boston] wanted, regardless of what the locals thought,” Baker said. “In the 1650s when they took over Maine, they renamed the communities now called York, Scarborough and Falmouth - all names of Royalist strongholds that fell to the Puritans in the late 1640s. The locals in these communities must have been angry and humiliated. Maybe ‘Berwick’ was a similar insult?”
Added by diana butcher on Jun 24, 2016 2:43 PM
diana butcher
Brackett connection to Austin
Hi Betty,
These are new working notes that I put in my genealogy database today under Daniel Brackett. I already have some under Jeremiah.
Let me know what you think, keeping in mind
that the Austins and Bracketts came from
ME (which was MA back then) to NY and on to MI:

This is what I worked out on 24 Jun 2016 after studying what Jeremiah B. Austin's descendants state - that Jeremiah's father/grandfather came from Scotland and that the father or grandfather worked at a dry dock on the River Clyde (which is near Glasgow).

http://www.curiousfox.com/vill100/Lanarkshire27850_5.html
Posted Oct 2004
Glasgow, Lanarkshire
Glasgow
Looking for information on Jeremiah B. Austin who was born in Scotland about 1801. According to family stories he was born in Scotland and his father was a shipbuilder on the River Clyde. Jeremiah B. Austin either came as a child or a young man to Niagara to Orleans County, New York and got married to a Olive Green. I am in search for his parents. I have a lot on him in the United States that I am willing to share.

Diana's notes:
1. I figure that it was Jeremiah's B. (Brackett, probably) Austin's Grandfather Brackett (and possibly could have been the Austin grandfather, as well) who came from the Country of Scotland, unless it was Scotland, Berwick, ME from whence he came.


2. Daniel Brackett came from Scotland to Berwick. And, Scotland was part of the town of Berwick,
ME. So, Daniel could have been born in the Country of Scotland or the section of Berwick,
known as Scotland. I'm banking on Scotland, Berwick, ME. If so, some of the Daniel and Mary/Polly (Brackett) Austin descendants, including what I worked up, may be incorrect. I used the Daniel Austin - Hannah Charles line in the 1970's and 1980's, then switched to what the Austin Families of America has with William Austin and Laughing Water as the earliest Austin, and now wondering about Berwick, ME.

3. http://intlmerch.tripod.com/id5.html

Origin of the name "Brackett"

White Winter Premium Oak Brackett. This stuff elevates beer drinking to a new level. Brackett is a style of mead, which is an alcoholic drink made from honey, water and yeast. Mead-making pre-dates beer and wine making, having origins dating back 8,000 years. Brackett originates from ancient Scandinavia and is made by adding malt to mead. It's a stout, full-bodied drink with a slightly thicker viscosity and higher alcohol content than other fermented grain beverages. Legend has it that sweet mead promotes fertility. Ladies, this mead's for you!

It is now quite certain that my ancestor is Anthony Brackett an early 1630's Maine settler possibly born in 1613 in Norfolk, England or Scotland. He died 1696 in Sandy Beach (Rye), NH . Reccords from my cousin Warren in Jan 06 confirm this . I am still looking for the exact link in the 1770 to 1800 generation. my confirmed ancestor Jacob Brackett was born 8 nov 1800 Berwick,York, Maine There are several possibilities as to which Brackett was his father.
Any help would be helpfull.

See also this page
http://home.earthlink.net/~anderson207/BrackIndex.html and related pages!

4. http://www.oldberwick.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=261&Itemid=255
Old Berwick Historical Society

The Scottish Prisoners of 1650
Why “Berwick”?
17th century tower in Dunbar, Scotland

Until 1814, Maine’s three Berwicks -- South Berwick, Berwick and North Berwick -- were all one town, Berwick.

Why that name?

Many New England towns were named for English towns -- Plymouth, Massachusetts or Dover, New Hampshire, for example. Some -- like Pittsfield, MA, or Wolfeboro, NH -- were named to honor great English leaders. Throughout the 1600s the area that became the Berwicks in Maine was part of the town of Kittery and known at first as Quamphegan or Newichawannock. But gradually the name Barwick or Berwick took hold, taken from a town associated with England’s old rival, Scotland. Why?

17th century tower in Dunbar, Scotland

Except during brief intervals, Scotland was still a separate kingdom until the Act of Union in 1707. The Scottish throne and boundaries had long been disputed with London. The town of Berwick-on-Tweed (pronounced Barrick) is only about 40 miles (64.5 km) from the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, and sits right on the contested Scots-English border at the mouth of the Tweed River on the coast. In previous centuries, Berwick was also the name of the Tweed’s old wool-producing inland shire or county vital to international trade. Vikings had first settled there, and Berwick meant “Corn Bay” in the Norse language. In the Middle Ages, the town became Scotland’s busiest port. Today part of England but Scottish in culture and dialect, Berwick-on-Tweed has changed hands some 13 times during the past thousand years.

The former Scottish county of Berwick about a century ago is shown on the map below.* The town Berwick-on-Tweed at right, at the mouth of the Tweed River, faces the North Sea about 40 miles (64.5 km) southeast of Edinburgh, Scotland, but is on the English side of the border. Dunbar is about halfway between Berwick-on-Tweed and Edinburgh.
To enlarge the map, click on the small rectangle. The former Scottish county of Berwick about a century ago. The town Berwick-on-Tweed at right, at the mouth of the Tweed River, faces the North Sea about 40 miles (64.5 km) southeast of Edinburgh, Scotland, but is on the English side of the border. Dunbar is about halfway between Berwick-on-Tweed and Edinburgh.
=============================================================
The year 1650 marked one such struggle. At nearby Dunbar, situated midway between Edinburgh and the Scots-English border, Oliver Cromwell won a battle that allowed him to wrest the Scottish capital from Royalists and unify Scotland and England for several years. The battle of Dunbar (and another at Worcester in 1651) led to the forced emigration of captured Scottish soldiers to work in the American colonies. About 60 Scots were sent to Saugus Iron Works in Massachusetts, and about 25 were brought to set up the Great Works sawmill at a site that is now on Brattle Street in South Berwick, Maine.
=============================================================
When these young and impoverished prisoners eventually obtained their freedom they stayed, joining the English founding families of a tiny settlement. Among these displaced Scotsmen were said to be Niven Agnew, James Barry, Alexander Cooper, Daniel Ferguson, William Furbush, William Gowen, Peter Grant, George Gray, David Hamilton, Thomas Holme, John Key, Alexander Maxwell, John Neal, John Reed, John Ross, John Taylor, William Thomson, and James Warren (from Downeast Ancestry, Vol. 9, No. 3). Learn more about the trail of the 1650 Scottish prisoners.

As the years passed, the name Berwick began to appear. "Settleing Barwicke Bridg," reads the Maine Provincial and Court Records III, p. 32. of June 28, 1682. "It is ordered that the Select Men of Barwicke, do forthwith appoint 3 meete persons, to join with the committee impoured for erecting of a bridg over little Newgewwanacke [i.e. Great Works] River...” The choice of Barwick or Berwick as a name seems strange. The conscript soldiers captured at Dunbar had apparently come from all over Scotland, so Berwick wasn’t a common ancestral home. Their descendants would have made up only a fraction of the local population, and soon became assimilated, apparently professing English Congregationalism rather than the Presbyterianism of their homeland. To them the name Berwick, rather than symbolizing a treasured part of their past, more likely had negative associations with 1650 and with earlier battles in which the Scots went down to defeat. So why would the Scottish and English colonists of southern Maine have named their parish after the Scottish Berwick?

Historian Emerson W. Baker thinks the name Berwick could have been a domination tactic forced on the settlement by the Puritan church authorities in Boston.

“Massachusetts tended to name communities as [Boston] wanted, regardless of what the locals thought,” Baker said. “In the 1650s when they took over Maine, they renamed the communities now called York, Scarborough and Falmouth - all names of Royalist strongholds that fell to the Puritans in the late 1640s. The locals in these communities must have been angry and humiliated. Maybe ‘Berwick’ was a similar insult?”
Added by diana butcher on Jun 24, 2016 2:41 PM
diana butcher
Jeremiah
Betty,
Thanks very much.
Diana
Added by diana butcher on Jun 16, 2016 7:49 PM
diana butcher
Reply
Thank you for your reply, Betty. I wish I still had the correspondence that I received - a large manila envelope received about Jeremiah. But, it goes with what you stated. However, I feel very strongly that Jeremiah was the son of William Austin, Sr. and nephew of Daniel. Why else would they reside across from each other per the History of Clarendon? We all have our theories. We need proof, that is basically non-existent, at least to my knowledge. With appreciation, Diana
Added by diana butcher on Jun 16, 2016 6:04 PM
diana butcher
Clarendon
Hi Betty,

Would you please let me know your source of Jeremiahs birthplace of Clarendon. This entry on findagrave confirms my 35 yr. suspicion that he was the son of William Austin Sr. and therefore, the brother of William Austin, Jr.

With appreciation,

Diana
Added by diana butcher on Jun 16, 2016 9:20 AM
diana butcher
Clarendon
Hi Betty,

Would you please let me know your source of Jeremiah's birthplace of Clarendon. This entry on findagrave confirms my 35 yr. suspicion that he was the son of William Austin Sr. and therefore, the brother of William Austin, Jr.

With appreciation,

Diana
Added by diana butcher on Jun 16, 2016 9:20 AM
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