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G Giebner (#47161525)
 member for 5 years, 11 months
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Bio Photo I am a local cemetery research volunteer working with a small team from the Fairfield County (SC) Genealogical Society. We specialize in locating and identifying the "lost, abandoned, forgotten, small, family" cemeteries. Fairfield County and portions of contiguous counties are our "hunting" areas. Members of our team have found about 150 tiny cemeteries in this very rural county and remain focused on finding more. It's been estimated that there may be as many as 200 of these forgotten burying places scattered out there in the boondocks just in this county alone. It's satisfying and (we feel) useful work. It can be a little dangerous because of reptiles and other natural conditions so we do not venture into the outback singly, and rarely in hot weather. Rattlesnakes and rock walls go together like PB&J. It isn't unusual to be a mile from the nearest habitation and help - it can be a big, lonely country out there. South Carolina may be a "small" state but don't try graving alone out there in the boondocks; be smart or your bones may never be found.

Fairfield County, South Carolina, in particular, was in the pathway westward for hundreds, if not thousands, of people from the latter 1700s to the latter 1800s approximately; a good "stopping off place" for those wanting a better, or perhaps somewhat easier, life in that era before electricity, cars, and paved roads. It was a good route southerly and westerly, bypassing the Appalachians with their wagons and the family cow. They came from all points north, tired of the cold, harsh, long winters. People came and settled because the winters were milder, there was good game hunting and fishing, plenty of good water, flowing streams, and the growing season was long. They stayed for a generation or two (or three) and tried farming. They buried their many dead babies, young children, young wives from childbirth, their old folks near where they homesteaded. Then they died out themselves or moved on and their burying places were then lost, abandoned, forgotten. To this very day much of Fairfield County is still a low population area. The primary crop is timber management for large corporations and wealthy individuals the very same areas where the settlers had their brief stays. Now only forestry-type people, game management, hunters, loggers, and a few old time residents, have knowledge of these little cemeteries, often just one or two graves. I have to say that it's always a thrill to find another small, undiscovered, cemetery - each time that happens, it continues to drive me to keep on looking for more. This research and identification of grave sites is our contribution to the future. It isn't uncommon to get e-mails from someone who discovered our posts on Find-a-grave and who are excited to find their long lost 4x-grandparents. Of course, we take pleasure in that but the real satisfaction is in finding, mapping, recording, and photographing the hundreds of burials for posterity.

Someone wrote that Find A Grave is not a genealogy web-site. I couldn't disagree more. It's a great resource. Should my efforts help someone, anyone, find some of their family members or ancestors, then my 'work' is well worth it.
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Messages left for G Giebner (40)[Leave Message]
CL Hileman
MOBERLY & THE LOST GRAVES
Thanks so much for all you do in keeping the memory of our loved ones alive. It is the dedication of persons like you helping those that cannot find the graves of our forefathers. Many cemeteries go unmapped and forgotten, often covered over, plowed under or built on top of, by the uncaring; making it impossible to locate and forever lost.
There's a special place in heaven for the guardians of our heritage - You will be there. I thank you whole heartedly! CL Hileman
Added by CL Hileman on Jun 14, 2015 1:13 PM
diane elkins
RE: Minnie James #110749795
Thanks for all the memorials you have added. It helps me with my family research. Diane
Added by diane elkins on May 09, 2015 8:49 AM
diane elkins
RE: Minnie James #110749795
The only thing I can find is a copy from the James Family Bible of her husband's family and they spelled her name Minnie Lucile Robertson. I don't know if that is proof enough or not. I have no one to ask. So many family members of that family are long gone. I don't guess it has to be on her memorial. Thanks, Diane
Added by diane elkins on May 08, 2015 4:34 PM
Betsy Starnes
RE: Louise T Simpson Patrick #42721521
Would be fine to transfer.
I have found 2 memorial pages for AT Simpson, one where he is buried in France and one where a marker in his remembrance is located where his parents are buried in Elgin, SC
He actually died 18 Nov 1944.
Thank you for starting this line of questioning.
AND thanks for all the time you have put into documenting these grave sites. Fairfield County has the best workers anywhere!
Added by Betsy Starnes on Apr 15, 2015 5:24 PM
Betsy Starnes
RE: Louise T Simpson Patrick #42721521
RHi Betsy!


Answer to the name Simpson...

My Aunt Louise's 1st husband was AT Simpson, who was in the US Army and was killed during World War II when his plane was shot down over France on Dec 18, 1942 I think

They have two sons William Simpson and Tommy Simpson. My cousin Tommy was flying on a B52 bomber in Vietnam and they were shot down Dec 18, 1972 and he was taken prisoner of war and when President Nixon got the prisoners releases Tommy got to come home. He retired from the Army as a full cornel. She married Uncle Mach Patrick in the early 1950's and they have a daughter Sarah Minton Patrick Holland who was born on July 5, 1957 , my Daddy's birthday!

Aunt Louise always kept Simpson as her middle name.
Added by Betsy Starnes on Apr 15, 2015 3:16 PM
Betsy Starnes
RE: Louise T Simpson Patrick #42721521
I don't know! Sarah Louise was a sister of Harold Timms. Harold's daughter is my sister-in-law. I will send her an email to see if she knows. I would guess a first marriage (?)
Can you link Louise with her spouse "Patrick". I don't have the #s but will look up if you need. Thank you,
Added by Betsy Starnes on Apr 15, 2015 2:27 PM
mikey sweek
thomas lyles
thanks for yhe photo of Thomas lyles marker it is a great photo.mikey sweek
Added by mikey sweek on Mar 05, 2015 9:20 PM
Patricia Craig
RE: Your 3x-great grandparents
They are John Robinson (1755-1832) and Sarah P (Paul) Robinson (1760-1840), in the Old Lebanon Presbyterian Church in Fairfield County. They immigrated from Northern Ireland before 1784. The next generation began the move south and west, with my 2x g-grandfather in Georgia and then Arkansas. Thank you again, Mr. Giebner.
Added by Patricia Craig on Feb 09, 2015 9:49 PM
Patricia Craig
Many thanks
I deeply appreciate your work and contributions to the ancestry searches of many of us. Like others, without your recording these gravesites I would not know where my 3rd g-grandparents ended their lives in South Carolina. Many others in my tree took that westward trail that you mentioned.
Added by Patricia Craig on Feb 09, 2015 8:02 PM
Jeff Rawl
Wirick/Wyrick Family graveyard
My wife inherited the property this graveyard sits on, but we are not familiar with the family. If anyone has any information on this, I would love to hear from you at rawlroost2@att.net
Added by Jeff Rawl on Jan 21, 2015 2:09 PM
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