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LilyPondLane (#47023500)
 member for 8 years, 10 months, 22 days
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Messages left for LilyPondLane (78)[Leave Message]
Queen Seeker of The Forgotten
RE: Gladys DuBois
Hello deeply sorry about that. As I was uploading it only showed one. Sometimes the uploading glitches. The memorial was updated. Thank you, Queen Seeker of The Forgotten ❤️
Added by Queen Seeker of The Forgo... on May 21, 2017 8:45 PM
Mindy
Garvey photos
You are very welcome, glad I could help. It was even easier than you think because Carl and his wife were on the back of the Garvey marker, so only one stone involved! Thanks also for having the plot information, it's near impossible at this cemetery to find anyone without the plot. Best regards, Mindy
Added by Mindy on May 13, 2017 11:13 AM
Mindy
Photo of Stella Garvey gravw
Hi, I uploaded the photos you requested for the Garveys. Please note the discrepancy for the death date of Stella!
Added by Mindy on May 13, 2017 7:59 AM
Robert Schmitt
RE: Warren L. Brotherhood
Hello again. I just located another article from The Music News. The July 30, 1920 edition, Page 15, notes that on June 11, 1920, juvenile students of Stella Garvey held a concert at the Wisconsin Conservatory. Here's the link:

https://books.google.com/books?id=O2lFAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA4-PA15&lpg=RA4-PA15&dq=stella+garvey+wisconsin+conservatory&source=bl&ots=wo-tc_m3Tr&sig=KLhrlLuLbnR_WUAH6WIXAMc3qgQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj5ooXm-srTAhUS-mMKHfqJBMAQ6AEIMTAE#v=onepage&q=stella%20garvey%20wisconsin%20conservatory&f=false

I wanted to mention that I have a portrait painting in my hallway that connects to all this. I thought the answer to the identity of this person was lost to antiquity, but our correspondence and research are like following a trail of breadcrumbs, that will hopefully lead me back into time to find the answer.

My Great Aunty Anna had a voice teacher at the Conservatory, around the same time as your Uncle Warren. Anna was an avid art collector, and had a sizeable collection. The teacher (I know from my late mother that it was a woman) had a portrait painting of her niece (who looks to be about ten years old in the painting), and she gave it to my Great Aunt in gratitude, as an addition to her collection. My Great Aunt knew the teacher's family.

I'm not 100% sure, but I'm beginning to think that I have a portrait of Stella Garvey's niece in my hallway. My Great Aunt never had children or got married. So when she moved to Florida in the late 1960's she gave much of her art to relatives. That particular painting went to her nephew (my dad), and then to me.

It's possible the painting may have belonged to a different teacher at the Conservatory, but I'm starting to think it was Stella. First, there weren't a lot of women teachers back in those days, second, my Great Aunt took singing lessons - not piano or violin, and third, Milwaukee was a much smaller community then. Washington Park with its zoo and the Irish neighborhood of Merrill Park were both on the very edge of town in 1920.

That's one of the reasons I would like to someday access the Conservatory archives. It would answer a lot of questions that I wish I could ask my Grandfather and Great Aunt, but alas.
Added by Robert Schmitt on Apr 29, 2017 8:16 PM
Robert Schmitt
RE: Warren L. Brotherhood
Hello again. I just located another article from The Music News. The July 30, 1920 edition, Page 15, notes that on June 11, 1920, juvenile students of Stella Garvey held a concert at the Wisconsin Conservatory. Here's the link:

https://books.google.com/books?id=O2lFAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA4-PA15&lpg=RA4-PA15&dq=stella+garvey+wisconsin+conservatory&source=bl&ots=wo-tc_m3Tr&sig=KLhrlLuLbnR_WUAH6WIXAMc3qgQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj5ooXm-srTAhUS-mMKHfqJBMAQ6AEIMTAE#v=onepage&q=stella%20garvey%20wisconsin%20conservatory&f=false

I wanted to mention that I have a painting in my hallway that connects to all this. I thought the answer was lost to antiquity, but our correspondence and research are like following a trail of breadcrumbs.

My Great Aunty Anna had a voice teacher at the Conservatory, around the same time as your Uncle Warren. Anna was an avid art collector, and had a sizeable collection. The teacher (I know from my late mother that it was a woman) had a portrait painting of her niece (who looks to be about ten years old in the painting), and she gave it to my Great Aunt in gratitude, as an addition to her collection. My Great Aunt knew the teacher's family.

I'm not 100% sure, but I'm beginning to think that I have a portrait of Stella Garvey's niece in my hallway. My Great Aunt never had children or got married. So when she moved to Florida in the late 1960's she gave much of her art to relatives. That particular painting went to her nephew (my dad), and then to me.

That's one of the reasons I would like to someday access the Conservatory archives. It would answer a lot of questions that I wish I could ask my Grandfather
Added by Robert Schmitt on Apr 29, 2017 7:39 PM
Robert Schmitt
RE: Warren L. Brotherhood
Hello again. I just located another article from The Music News. The July 30, 1920 edition, Page 15, notes that on June 11, 1920, juvenile students of Stella Garvey held a concert at the Wisconsin Conservatory. Here's the link:

https://books.google.com/books?id=O2lFAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA4-PA15&lpg=RA4-PA15&dq=stella+garvey+wisconsin+conservatory&source=bl&ots=wo-tc_m3Tr&sig=KLhrlLuLbnR_WUAH6WIXAMc3qgQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj5ooXm-srTAhUS-mMKHfqJBMAQ6AEIMTAE#v=onepage&q=stella%20garvey%20wisconsin%20conservatory&f=false

I wanted to mention that I have a painting in my hallway that connects to all this. I thought the answer was lost to antiquity, but our correspondence and research are like following a trail of breadcrumbs.

My Great Aunty Anna had a voice teacher at the Conservatory, around the same time as your Uncle Warren. Anna was an avid art collector, and had a sizeable collection. The teacher (I know from my late mother that it was a woman) had a portrait painting of her niece (who looks to be about ten years old in the painting), and she gave it to my Great Aunt in gratitude, as an addition to her collection. My Great Aunt knew the teacher's family.

I'm not 100% sure, but I'm beginning to think that I have a portrait of Stella Garvey's niece in my hallway. My Great Aunt never had children or got married. So when she moved to Florida in the late 1960's she gave much of her art to relatives. That particular painting went to her nephew (my dad), and then to me.

That's one of the reasons I would like to someday access the Conservatory archives. It would answer a lot of questions that I wish I could ask my Grandfather
Added by Robert Schmitt on Apr 29, 2017 7:38 PM
Robert Schmitt
RE: Warren L. Brotherhood
Hello, what a small world. When I was young, in the late 1950's and '60s, our family dentist was downtown, east of the Milwaukee River. I think either on Mason or Wells. We used to park in the Milwaukee Street Garage when street parking couldn't be found. My mom and dad weren't ones to spend a lot of time driving around the block looking for an open parking space.

I grew up in the Milwaukee area, but have been living in California for the past 37 years.

This week I spoke with a friend of mine who is quite proficient at PDF-format online documents, and knows how to print a single page. Hopefully I can obtain those three pages from the 1921 edition of Polk's Wisconsin State Gazetteer and Business Directory. If our efforts are successful, I will gladly send them to you by e-mail.

My apologies for giving you a wrong page number in a previous message. The Gazetteer pages are 1818, 1821 and 1820 (not 2020). My spell check didn't catch the error, since it's a number.

Some years back I contacted the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music, seeking information about my Great Aunt, Anna M. Schmitt, and my Aunty Betty, as both had attended there. I was told that the Conservatory has extensive achives. It would be fascinating to see what documents they might have for our relatives - music teachers, when they attended, concert programs, photographs.

Also, I just looked up and found the listing on this site for my Great Aunt.

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Schmitt&GSfn=Anna&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=51&GScnty=3032&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=16358625&df=all&

She is buried in Holy Cross Cemetery, alongside her parents (my Great Grandparents), the ones who lived just a few blocks from the Brotherhood home.

Best wishes to you, Bob
Added by Robert Schmitt on Apr 29, 2017 2:57 PM
Robert Schmitt
RE: Warren L. Brotherhood
Hello, I've been busy doing research, and found the answer regarding the Hambitzer Music House in Milwaukee. It turns out that Charles Hambitzer's father owned the store, and it was still in business in 1922.

I did a Google search for "Hambitzer Milwaukee", and the first listing is a Library of Congress document, in PDF format, titled "Charles Hambitzer Music Transcripts". On Page 3 is the following paragraph under "Biographical Note":

"Charles Hambitzer (1878 or 1881-1918) was born in Beloit, Wisconsin, to a musical family. His great-grandfather was a violinist at the Russian court and his father owned a music store in Milwaukee. After studying with Julius Albert Jahn and Hugo Kaun, Hambitzer played in the orchestra of the Arthur Friend Stock Company, and taught piano, violin, and cello at the Wisconsin Conservatory. In 1908, he moved to New York City, where he joined Joseph Knechtís orchestra at the Waldorf-Astoria, frequently appearing as a piano soloist. At the same time, he opened a music studio on the Upper West Side, and among his many pupils was the fourteen-year-old George Gershwin, who began his studies with Hambitzer in 1912. In 1914, Hambitzerís wife died of tuberculosis, and in 1918 he succumbed to the same disease, exacerbated by an emotional breakdown. It has been widely suggested that his death caused the young Gershwin to abandon his own budding career as a concert pianist."

In the September 9, 1922 issue of The Music Trades, there is an article on Page 35 titled "Merchandise Chat". It states in one sentence:

"Leading sales at the Hambitzer Music House, Milwaukee, are saxophones and ukuleles."

Here's the link:

https://books.google.com/books?id=7JZQAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA8-PA35&lpg=RA8-PA35&dq=hambitzer+music+milwaukee&source=bl&ots=8Kup-Q4NL9&sig=XkoxuQ5638Net-rBqjYBoI40qUU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj00PO9jL3TAhXDx1QKHVu-CZAQ6AEIKDAE#v=onepage&q=hambitzer%20music%20milwaukee&f=false

This is important information for my family records as well. Both your Uncle Warren and my Great Aunty Anna almost certainly purchased their librettos for "Yokohama Maid" at Hambitzer Music House, your Uncle Warren the libretto for "The Mikado", and the same for my Grandfather's classical piano sheet music. The other music stores at the time, based on what I've seen, sold piano rolls or sheet music to popular songs of the time.

In addition, I found the 1921 edition of Polk's Wisconsin State Gazetteer and Business Directory. Here's the link:

https://books.google.com/books?id=NUlEAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA1821&lpg=PA1821&dq=hambitzer+music+house+milwaukee&source=bl&ots=cO7mxEGGwg&sig=3nLoNvcUSQNFDOafZiIZKuDnnic&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj7w62pmL3TAhUC-2MKHZ6aCroQ6AEINDAF#v=onepage&q=hambitzer%20music%20house%20milwaukee&f=false

If you scroll up a few pages to Page 1818, under the heading of Music Teachers, the Milwaukee section lists Beecher C. Burton on Wisconsin Avenue, and on Page 2020, the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music, then located on the 3rd Floor of the Stephenson Building, which is still there. Here's a link to the building's information:

http://oldmilwaukee.net/detail-history-form.php?id=341

Page 1821 lists Charles J. Hambitzer on Milwaukee Street.
Added by Robert Schmitt on Apr 24, 2017 8:11 AM
Robert Schmitt
RE: Warren L. Brotherhood
Thank you for the information and link. I just found an article that reviews, in part, a revival production of "The Mikado" in Milwaukee that was staged in 1921, just a year before "Yokohama Maid". And one of stars was...Beecher Burton. It doesn't mention either one of our relatives, but I can guarantee the my family members were seated in the audience. Especially the way they loved that opera. Perhaps this was the production your Uncle Warren performed in. The article is at the top center of the page.

https://books.google.com/books?id=pjg_AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA9-PA24&lpg=RA9-PA24&dq=the+mikado+badger+opera&source=bl&ots=hQdJCfO_WR&sig=pKWqNGE5kS_gVG3_FmKaAQZH8a4&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj0x9mF87jTAhUM-GMKHZAmApcQ6AEINjAE#v=onepage&q=the%20mikado%20badger%20opera&f=true
Added by Robert Schmitt on Apr 22, 2017 2:43 PM
Robert Schmitt
RE: Warren L. Brotherhood
Hello, I am not sure of the exact date for either the Milwaukee Journal article or the two performances, but it was during the Summer of 1922. Here is the link to an article in the August 11, 1922 issue of The Music News, a prominent publication at the time in Chicago that covered opera and symphony in the Great Lakes region. It mentions my Great Aunt as a new talent in the Milwaukee opera scene after those performances.

https://books.google.com/books?id=bmhFAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA22&lpg=RA1-PA22&dq=anna+schmitt+yokohama+maid&source=bl&ots=e81Hz7WyuX&sig=cxfZoOSr_jNjp8RXTyO7w7_7GBM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiJlJyzxLjTAhUmHGMKHbW8DJIQ6AEIGjAA#v=onepage&q=anna%20schmitt%20yokohama%20maid&f=false

So the production, which included your Uncle Warren, must have really been a huge success, and was clearly one of the major social events of 1922 to receive such extensive coverage in the media. No doubt that's why my Grandparents held on to that Milwaukee Journal article for the rest of their lives.

I also found the house address for the Schmitt family back then. It's on my Grandfather's birth certificate. They lived at 2214 West Vliet Street, just on the other side of what is now Tiefenthaler Park from your family's home. My Grandfather, Edward B. Schmitt, was born in the house on May 29, 1890. That's just 11 days after your Uncle Warren. It's quite likely, since they were the same age, that they attended the neighborhood school together, and played in the park.

I wanted to make a quick correction to an earlier message. The opera performance took place at 33rd and Lloyd Streets. It appears from looking at Google Maps that the church and adjoining parish hall are still there, but it's no longer St. Andrews. All the best to you.
Added by Robert Schmitt on Apr 22, 2017 1:11 PM
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